News

G8 on IPR: The Commentary

May 25, 2012
Categories: Intellectual Property

This time last week, the Group of Eight (G8) was meeting at Camp David to address the world’s most pressing economic and political challenges.  Jobs and growth were top of the agenda.  As part of this focus, the commitments in the Camp David Declaration underscored “the importance of intellectual property rights (IPR) to stimulating job and economic growth” and the need for multiple ways to address “high standards for IPR protection and enforcement, including through international legal instruments and mutual assistance agreements, as well as through government procurement processes, private-sector voluntary codes of best practice…”

CREATe applauded the G8 for focusing on this issue.  We also asked a few thought leaders to give us their perspective on the significance of the G8 statement on IPR.  Here’s what they had to say:

“The G8 statement demonstrates the growing awareness among the G8 leaders of how important intellectual property rights are, not only to investors, but for the creation of jobs and the sustainability of an open global economy, from which all countries benefit.”

John G. Ruggie
Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs
Faculty Chair, Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative
Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Affiliated Professor in International Legal Studies
Harvard Law School

 

“As a former official who worked on many G8 Communiques, I believe the Camp David Declaration’s statements on intellectual property rights (IPR) is a strong affirmation of the centrality of IPR protection to economic growth and job creation and a strong commitment by G8 governments to take vigorous action to enforce IPR.  We should hold them to this commitment.”

Alan Larson
Senior International Policy Advisor
Covington & Burling LLP
Chair, Transparency International USA

 

“This is a welcome signal that G8 leaders recognize that IP protection is critical to driving innovation and that they also recognized the role of private-sector voluntary codes of best practices as an important part of the overall IP protection system.”

Robert D. Atkinson, Ph.D.
President of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation